Pure Pause Berlin

Pure Pause shop on Dudenstrasse in Berlin

 

PURE PAUSE

Where food for thought meets creative thinking

 

You may know Dudenstraße from it’s proximity to the renowned Tempelhofer feld. But just around the corner from Mehringdamm lies a beautiful building by architect Max Taut, called Haus der Buchdrucker. The lego-like appearance with it’s primary coloured frames is enough to make you stop and admire, but it’s the beautifully designed branding of the Pure Pause store, that prompted me to take a closer look.

 

Pure Pause, Products made in Berlin

 

The green pastel and vibrant orange of the Pure Pause space reminds me of a retro 70’s interior, but with beautifully designed shelves and well selected used furniture, the look is refreshingly different from the grandma’s-house-turned-café appearance of so many Berlin establishments.

 

Behind sea blue french doors lies the Pure Pause innovation lab or salon, a space for interactive workshops and events. Custom-made modular furniture allows one to transform and adapt the environment to different needs. Here the furniture becomes a conversation piece along with facilitating interactions between people, like a settee, designed for intimate discussions that converts into stepped seating for a bigger audience.

 

Pure Pause innovation lab

 

The space is intended to encourage innovative ways of thinking and, as the perfect juncture between taste and likes, Pure Pause employs food as a neutral territory to kickstart conversations. The adjacent shop stocks a carefully selected assortment of unusual refreshments created and produced in Berlin. They focus on products and producers with unique characters, things like a caffeinated soda made from sun dried coffee cherries or fruit liquor from natural botanics; interesting stories to jumpstart creative discussions.

 

Made-in-Berlin-refreshments-and-Pure-Pause

 

The shop is open only on Fridays, but you can also order food parcels as gifts or refreshment packages for events or seminars. So even if you don’t intend to host a workshop or kickstart a corporate event, you can still enjoy the wonderful selection of made-in-Berlin sweats and treats. More information around bookings and opening times can be found on their website.

 

Workshop area at Pure Pause in Berlin

workshop-area-at-pure-pause

A rainy day escape to the Berlin Botanical Gardens

A rainy day trip to the Berlin Botanical gardens.

 

THE BERLIN BOTANICAL GARDENS

A rainy day escape

 

On her recent trip to Berlin, my lovely sister Almarie suggested we venture down to Steglitz for a visit to the Berlin botanical gardens. Almarie’s quite the phytophile and so we hopped on our bicycles and headed down south.

 
Tropical Greenhouse at Berlin Botanical Gardens
 

From the entrance on Unter den Eichen the gardens didn’t look like much, but we payed the 6 euro entrance anyway and proceeded into the park. Soon after we set down the first pathway I started feeling a little apprehensive about the outing. Thus far the Berlin botanical garden grounds were rather, er, underwhelming and it had just started to drizzle. With dismay I thought we’d chosen probably the worst day to explore a mildly exciting garden and suggested we headed to the glass houses to escape the rain.

 

Weird and wonderful plants at the Berlin Botanical GardenBotanical-Gardens-Berlin-Tropical-Greenhouse

 

As soon as we entered the huge mechanical structure my disdain swiftly disappeared. The conservatories or Gewächshäuser, as they’re called in german, are huge glass and steel structures that cleverly controls the weather and with its 23m high dome the main tropical greenhouse is one of the largest in the world. Thanks to its size, the Berlin botanical conservatory houses a breathtaking tropical paradise with giant palm trees and towering vines and epiphytes.

 

Berlin Botanical Garden Conservatory Detail

Beutiful-and-strange-specimens-at-Berlin-Botanical-Garden

 

Next we found ourselves in the desserts of the south with a marvellous welwitschia enchanting us with its beautiful inelegance. More succulents and cacti awaited in the adjacent chambers with long furry characters and their spiky friends. To our amazement the botanical greenhouses held an incredibly rich collection of specimens; from China, New Zealand and Japan, to Africa, North America and the Canaries. In fact they have 15 different chambers, each designated to a specific biosphere. 

 

Cacti and succulents from the Berlin Botanical Gardens
 
We spent so much time in every hall that we had to break for coffee – and off course on account of the weather – for some cake. I can highly recommend the chocolate one. It was delicious. The cappuccino wasn’t bad either.

With full bellies we went on to explore the carnivorous plants and gawked at the almost florescent flowers in the rainforest. Later we felt proud and a little nostalgic to discover the beautiful South African biosphere with it’s massive species of Aloes, crassulas and euphorbias.

 

Greenhouse at the Botanical Gardens in Berlin

 

Finally, our trip around the world ended in the Mediterranean, but not before we got a short introduction to the different uses of plants; things like cocoa and bulbs and poisons I do not remember the name of.

What I thought was going to be a drab and dreary day turned out to be a spectacular journey around the world – an absolutely sensory rich experience. So if you love plants as much as I do and you feel like taking a trip abroad but can’t afford the plane ticket, just pop into the greenhouses at the Berlin botanical gardens. It’ll be a mind-blowing treat.

 

 

When to go: Open all year but perfect for rainy days

Where is it: Entrances are on Unter den Eichen 5-10, 12203 Berlin (Metrobus M48) or Königin-Luise-Platz, 14195 Berlin (ExpressBus X83, Bus 101)

Price per person: €6.00 (Cash only – they do not take credit, debit cards or EC Karte)